Model buses have long been a popular genre of childrens toys. The main makers in the 20th century were Corgi, Dinky, Matchbox, St. Petersburg, and Tootsie Toy. Some Japanese and other Asian companies also released models similar to those of Corgi and Dinky. Model buses were made of lithographed tin, pressed steel, aluminum, plastics, and even a few in cast iron. Look for condition, but also for real-life bus lines and city names stamped on the buses. Pressed steel, lithographed tin, and cast iron model buses generally fetch the highest prices.

The Museum is pleased to carry many bus models. Of course, our primary source for the “collector” type buses is Corgi. Did you know that the Corgi company was sold and have recently gone through a total overhaul? They are now owned by Hornby America and the Museum has already received an order from the new company. However, let me tell you that they are slow in revving up the models that were shown to be coming out by Corgi just before the buyout. But if you are patient—you will soon see these on our shelves. We are happy to be able to sell a Corgi model of one of our very own buses—the 1947 FLXIBLE 29B-47 7910 Capitol Bus Company 64. You can see the model on our Gift Shop Page (https://www.busmuseum.org/GiftShop.html) and order it through there. Unfortunately, most of the other models we received from Corgi are not purchased in the quantity that allows us to offer them online but if you visit our gift shop you can purchase them there.

Also, if you are a member and receive our “Musings” you will see we have a “resident” toy expert, Doug Campbell—who not only keeps us informed of new bus models available but does a great job in describing them for us with tips on the hobby of collecting. If you aren’t a member yet, please visit our Membership Page (https://www.busmuseum.org/Membership.html) and sign up today.